Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Leukemia

A lot of people out there do not menyadarai about the early danger of leukemia that often attack humans and are very difficult to cure, and sometimes even they are not really aware that he was a cancer patient's blood.
It is important to recognize the symptoms early and treat this dangerous disease before it's too late and regret.

How Do I Know If I Have Leukemia?

Because many types of leukemia show no obvious symptoms early in the disease, leukemia may be diagnosed incidentally during a physical exam or as a result of routine blood testing. If a person appears pale, has enlarged lymph nodes, swollen gums, an enlarged liver or spleen, significant bruising, bleeding, fever, persistent infections, fatigue, or a small pinpoint rash, the doctor should suspect leukemia. A blood test showing an abnormal white cell count may suggest the diagnosis. To confirm the diagnosis and identify the specific type of leukemia, a needle biopsy and aspiration of bone marrow from a pelvic bone will need to be done to test for leukemic cells, DNA markers, and chromosome changes in the bone marrow.

Important factors in leukemia include the age of the patient, the type of leukemia, and the chromosomal abnormalities found in leukemia cells and bone marrow.

What Are the Treatments for Leukemia?

While the reported incidence of leukemia has not changed much since the 1950s, more people are surviving longer thanks mainly to advances in chemotherapy. Childhood leukemia (3 out of 4 cases in children is ALL), for example, represents one of the most dramatic success stories of cancer treatment. The five-year survival rate for children with ALL has risen to about 85% today.

For acute leukemia, the immediate goal of treatment is remission. The patient undergoes chemotherapy in a hospital and stays in a private room to reduce the chance of infection. Since acute leukemia patients have extremely low counts of healthy blood cells, they are given blood and platelet transfusions to help prevent or stop bleeding. They receive antibiotics to prevent or treat infection. Medications to control treatment-related side effects are given as well.


There are various tests that can be done to help diagnose a patient for leukemia. The following two methods are the most common:

1. Physical Examination - Often used to check for lumps, abnormalities, or certain leukemia symptoms that may be present in a patient. This examination will usually include a thorough revision of the patients medical history, family history, and any risk factors that may exist specific to the patient. After the examination has been completed, it is usual for blood testing to follow.

2. Blood Tests - Such as CBC (complete blood count) tests can detect leukemia by determining the number of both red and white blood cells, together with the platelets (the small, round, thin blood cells that help the blood to stop flowing from a cut by becoming thick and sticky), the number of red blood cells that make-up the blood sample, and the amount of hemoglobin that consists in the blood. 


With the ever know earlier about the symptoms and irregularities blood cells in our body, the most common thing and prudent thing to do is to a healthy lifestyle and never forget to always exercise. It is important to prevent than to treat a disease even if you have a lot of health insurance and money.